Tag: server monitoring software

FrameFlow Server and IT Systems Monitoring Software
FrameFlow Server and IT Systems Monitoring Software

What Makes FrameFlow Server and IT Systems Monitoring Software Stand Out?

At FrameFlow, we fully understand the importance monitoring all the various IT systems that are critical to your business operations including: servers, routers, switches, HVAC systems, temperature sensors, back-up power supplies and virtually any type of device with an IP address, to ensure they are indeed performing as required. Our cutting edge, but easy to use and fully customizable monitoring software scales to continually scan 10s of 1000s of IT systems, with over 85 different monitoring types to cover all requirements.

Here’s the rundown on some of the special features that make FrameFlow standout.

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Top 5 Issues Detected by FrameFlow Server Monitoring Software
Top 5 Issues Detected by FrameFlow Server Monitoring Software

Top Five Issues Detected by FrameFlow Server Monitoring Software

Here at FrameFlow, as we continually strive to offer a robust and versatile server and IT systems monitoring solution for a variety of enterprise customers, we’ve noticed that there are several common issues, some of which are interrelated, detected by our software across the board. Here’s a rundown on the top five:

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FrameFlow Uses MQTT to Monitor IoT Sensors and Devices
FrameFlow Uses MQTT to Monitor IoT Sensors and Devices

FrameFlow Leverages Versatile MQTT Protocol to Monitor IoT Sensors and Devices

As FrameFlow evolves with our maturing technological landscape, we are pleased to announce that our software is now capable of monitoring a virtually unlimited range of devices by the leveraging the power of Message Queue Telemetry Transport, aka MQTT. Why is this important? MQTT is a versatile and lightweight messaging protocol that is finding an increasing number of applications on the Internet of Things (IoT).

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FrameFlow Version 2015.2: Behind the Scenes

Building FrameFlow Server Monitor: A Day in the Life

We do our best to keep our software lean and mean. Our business is 100% based on a try-before-you-buy model, so it’s important that we make a great first impression and part of that has to do with the ease of deployment and perception of quality. There are few things we hate more than when we go to download a simple utility to get a job done and it weighs over 500 megs in size.

Keeping our software fast, efficient and small isn’t always an easy thing. We’re sometimes at the mercy of third-party components that we integrate with and sometimes we have to deal with problems thrown our way by the development tools that we use.

Recently we faced a challenge along these lines and here is how it played out…

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Timing Flaw Discovered in Windows Ping Utility

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Timing Flaw Discovered in Windows Ping Utility

It’s not everyday that you discover a flaw in a core networking component of a major operating system, but that’s just what happened here at FrameFlow last week. The command line “ping” is the workhorse of network and server monitoring. It’s the basic test that any sysadmin will use to determine if a remote system is alive and responding to network requests. As we investigated in more detail we were even more surprised to discover that this bug is deep in the Windows API and affects pretty much any program that needs to run ping tests.

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Patch Tuesday for March 2015

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It’s Patch Tuesday again for all Windows sysadmins and this month’s delivery includes more fixes than usual.

Microsoft’s security bulletin lists 14 individual fixes including a fix for the recently discovered “FREAK” vulnerability. Of the fourteen fixes, 5 of them are rated Critical and the rest are Important.

Also included are fixes for issues in Internet Explorer, the VBScript scripting engine, a flaw in an Adobe font driver bundled with Windows, and issues in Microsoft Office. All of these could result in a remote code exploit so it’s vital that Windows-based systems are patched as soon as possible.

“FREAK” Vulnerability (CVE20150204): Pretty Much All Systems are Exposed

New Security Internet Security Flaw Discovered

The list of flaws in trusted security algorithms has grown again with the recent announcement of the “FREAK” (Factoring Attack on RSA-EXPORT Keys) vulnerability also known as CVE-2015-0204.

First reports confirmed that many OpenSSL implementations contained the flaw and today Microsoft issued Security Advisory 3046015 confirming that all versions of Windows are vulnerable.

Where Did The Freak Vulnerability (CVE2015-0204) Come From?

The details of the vulnerability are alarming and largely due to flawed federal policies on encryption dating back to the 1990s. Around that time products like PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) were starting to see wider distribution and the U.S. officials responded by passing laws to control the export of any product that included high grade encryption. It was a futile effort and the battle was eventually won by crusaders such as Phil Zimmerman.

Some would even say there is a darker side to government efforts on the control and distribution of encryption technology:

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Techniques for Fast and Efficient Server Monitoring

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CC Image courtesy of jakeliefer (Flickr: Old Keys) [CC-BY-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons]

Techniques for Fast and Efficient Server Monitoring

FrameFlow is highly customizable and offers a wide variety of monitoring options. We’ve designed it that way on purpose to give you the flexibility to build out your monitoring configuration in a way that best suits your work environment, practices and policies.

Authentication Methods

There’s one area where first time users often have questions and that’s when it comes to authentication. FrameFlow is an agentless monitoring system, which means we don’t install anything on the systems being monitored. Instead we use standard protocols to reach out to the monitored machines and collect the data we need. To do that we need to authenticate to the machines being monitored. This is a good thing because it means that FrameFlow plays by the rules when it comes to your network security polices rather than wildly opening ports to reveal monitoring data like some agent-based systems do.

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